46 Belge Aklin Yapisi

Computational Complexity

    Computational complexity theory, also called algorithmic complexity theory, seeks to answertwo different kinds of questions: "How hard is this problem?", and "How effective is thisalgorithm at solving this problem?". A number of difficult issues are involved here, and it is not possible to delve into them deeply without sophisticated mathematics. Here we shall only…

4.0 The Triarchic Theory Of Intelligence

  Though there is a vast psychological literature on intelligence, it contains surprisingly fewinsights into the foundational questions which interest us here: what is intelligence, and how can it, practically or theoretically, be quantified? The problem is that, as Robert Sternberg has observed, theories of intelligence are not all theories of the same thing. Rather,…

12.1 Design for a Thinking Machine

   A theory of mind and a theory of brain are two very different things. I have sketched anabstract Platonic structure, the master network, and claimed that the structure of every intelligententity must contain a component approximating this structure. But it would be folly to deny thatdifferent entities may approximate this structure in very different…

12.0 The Structure of Intelligence

The ideas of the previous chapters fit together into a coherent, symbiotic unit: the masternetwork. The master network is neither a network of physical entities nor a simple, cleveralgorithm. It is rather a vast, self-organizing network of self-organizing programs, continuallyupdating and restructuring each other. In previous chapters we have discussed particularcomponents of this network; but…

11.2 Consciousness and Emotion

   One often hears comments to the effect that "even if a computer could somehow think, it couldnever feel." And Dreyfus (1978), among others, has argued that this imposes strict limitations onthe potential power of computer thought. After all, what is intuition but a sense of what "feelsright"?   The weakest point of such arguments is…

11.1 Implications of the Quantum Theory of Consciousness

    The measurement paradox is not the only philosophically troublesome aspects of quantumphysics. Bell’s Theorem (1987), with its implication of instantaneous communication betweendistant events, is equally unsettling. The simplest example of this is the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen(EPR) thought experiment. Two electrons, initially coupled, are shot off in different directions. Itis assumed that each one flies for millions…

11.0 Toward A Quantum Theory of Consciousness

   For sixty years physicists have struggled with the paradox of quantum measurement.However, despite a number of theoretical advances, rather little progress has been made towardresolution of the basic dilemma. The problem is one of physics versus phenomenology.According to quantum physics, no physical entity is ever in a definite state; the most one canever say…

10.3 A Neural-Darwinist Perceptual-Motor Hierarchy

    In Chapter 6 we used Edelman’s theory of Neural Darwinism to explore the nature of neuralanalogy. However, we did not suggest how the "lower-to-intermediate-level" details discussedthere might fit into a theory of higher-level brain function. It is possible to give a partial Neural-Darwinist analysis of the perceptual and motor hierarchies. This entails wandering rather…

10.2 The Motor Control Hierarchy

    I propose a motor control hierarchy which is closely analogous to the perceptual hierarchy, butworks in the opposite direction. In the motor control hierarchy, the lower levels deal directlywith muscle movements, with bodily functions; whereas the higher levels deal with patterns inbodily movements, with schemes for arranging bodily movements. This much is similar to…